How were the ideas of Democritus and Dalton similar?

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Democritus and Dalton has similar ideas about the atom, but Democritus based his theory more on reason than science. Democritus lived from 460 AD to 370 AD. He reasoned that because a rock can be cut in half to produce two pieces of the same material, one could continue to...

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Democritus and Dalton has similar ideas about the atom, but Democritus based his theory more on reason than science. Democritus lived from 460 AD to 370 AD. He reasoned that because a rock can be cut in half to produce two pieces of the same material, one could continue to cut the rock into smaller and smaller pieces until eventually ending up a tiny indivisible particle that's the smallest quantity possible for the the material. Democritus believed that all materials were composed of these tiny particles that he called "atomos". He thought that these particles existed permanently without changing and that the particles that made up different materials were different.

John Dalton, who lived from 1766-1844, is considered the father of the modern atomic theory. He was the first scientist to offer evidence that matter exists as tiny particles. He called the particles "atoms" from Democritus' "atomos". His ideas were similar to those of Democrites in that he believed that atoms were indivisible and that atoms of one substance are all alike but are different from atoms of another substance.

Dalton, unlike Democritus, thought that atoms of one element could change into atoms of another element. His evidence for atoms came from experiments with evaporation. Dalton's ideas that atoms were indivisible and that all atoms of one element have the same mass were later invalidated by new evidence. 

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