How was Walt Whitman's writing different from the Fireside Poets'? Specifcally, how was it revolutionary? 

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To make it brief, the Fireside Poets were very traditional in terms of content and style, while Walt Whitman was far more revolutionary and experimental in how he composed his works.

The Fireside Poets achieved great popularity during their lifetimes, becoming the first American poets to do so within both the United States and Europe. However, their popularity declined with the coming of the twentieth century and the arrival of modernism. By then, their poetry seemed old-fashioned and trite.

Walt Whitman's works are more radical, both in their content (such as an honest sense of sexuality in Leaves of Grass) and style (his use of free verse). He wrote about subjects the Fireside Poets never bothered with, such as the common American person and the democratic spirit. Whitman's poems caused some bafflement upon initial publication, but the modernists of the twentieth century adored him, revering him as a uniquely American poet.

The Fireside Poets' poems usually had morals to convey or told...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 713 words.)

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