How was the sight of the hanged man a turning point for Crispin?  

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In Chapter 14, Crispin comes to a crossroads on a foggy morning. There he sees a corpse hanging from a gallows with a sign posted near him. Even though Crispin cannot read, he finds great meaning in the sight of the hanged man and decides that it is a message...

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In Chapter 14, Crispin comes to a crossroads on a foggy morning. There he sees a corpse hanging from a gallows with a sign posted near him. Even though Crispin cannot read, he finds great meaning in the sight of the hanged man and decides that it is a message from God. Over the previous days of his journey, Crispin had grown very depressed and felt that it was not worth living through all of this suffering thrust upon him. A nameless child until just a few days ago, he questioned his place and path in life now that he had no home, no family, and no community. When Crispin sees the dead man, he is overcome with emotion and realizes that he does not want to die. Crispin prays that he can follow God's path and live a good life so that he does not end up like the hanged man. Soon after, it seems that Crispin's prayers are answered when he meets Bear in the plague-ravaged village.

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