How was the conflict between Mrs. Baker and Holling solved in The Wednesday Wars by Gary Schmidt? 

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The conflict is solved by Mrs. Baker's kindness and the shared love of Shakespeare between her and Holling.

The book opens with a statement of the conflict between them from Holling's point of view. He says:

Of all the kids in the seventh grade at Camillo Junior High, there was...

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The conflict is solved by Mrs. Baker's kindness and the shared love of Shakespeare between her and Holling.

The book opens with a statement of the conflict between them from Holling's point of view. He says:

Of all the kids in the seventh grade at Camillo Junior High, there was one kid that Mrs. Baker hated with heat whiter than the sun.

Me.

He spends time with Mrs. Baker since he doesn't go to either Hebrew School or Catechism in the afternoon. Though she seems cold, she starts to warm up to him. The first time he recognizes that she might not hate him is when she offers him a cream puff.

But I was shocked. She had offered the hope of a cream puff. A brown, light, perfect cream puff. It was as if Mrs. Baker had suddenly become not Mrs. Baker. It was like I had had another vision, only this one was real.

After that, the two get along together much more smoothly. Mrs. Baker shows Holling that she doesn't hate him; she goes easy on him when he needs it. Eventually, they start to study Shakespeare together. Their mutual love of the work brings them together more than ever before and solves the conflict between them once and for all.

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I can't really say with much passion that there is a conflict between Holling Hoodhood and Mrs. Baker. The story begins giving readers this impression because Holling, as the narrator, tells readers that Mrs. Baker hates his guts. He believes this because she is obviously upset that she has to be the teacher that watches him while the other students go to their religious studies schools. Mrs. Baker even tries to have Holling take math over again. That isn't successful, so she has Holling do menial labor tasks around the classroom. Holling believes that these actions are signs of her hatred of him; however, her actions make perfect sense. Her off-period is extremely valuable to her. It allows her to prep for the next day and grade content from students. Now, she has to essentially babysit. Her conflict isn't with Holling; it's with the situation. Holling feels that the conflict intensifies once she starts forcing him to read Shakespeare; however, this task winds up being what builds a strong teacher–student relationship between the two characters. They end up mutually supporting each other through difficult circumstances throughout the school year.

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The conflict between Holling and his seventh-grade teacher Mrs. Baker in The Wednesday Wars by Gary Schmidt is largely a figment of Holling Hoodhood's vivid imagination. He is convinced that Mrs. Baker hates him with a fiery passion, but of course we learn quickly that she does not and Holling is imagining things.

Holling realizes this truth, too, but only a little at a time. When Mrs. Baker unexpectedly offers Holling a cream puff, he is stunned and the ice he feels melts a bit. When she does not scold him for accidentally letting her two rats, Sycorax and Caliban, loose when he was cleaning their cage, Holling warms up to Mrs. Baker a bit more. She, too, seems to have had a bit of a realization when she tells Holling that they have been wasting their Wednesdays and they begin to read Shakespeare together.

At one point in their reading, Holling knows things have changed between them. He says,

She looked up at me and almost smiled a real smile. Not a teacher smile. Think of it! Mrs. Baker almost smiling a real smile.

If I had to choose just one thing that seems to have made the most difference in the relationship between Holling and Mrs. Baker it would be when they started to read Shakespeare together. While there may not have been conflicts before this, their shared love of Shakespeare's language and stories certainly melts any real or perceived discord and unites them.

By the end of the story, of course, the two of them have experienced many things which have caused them to work together on things they both care about, and any conflicts in their relationship are long gone.

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