How is a virtual image formed in both a plane and convex mirror?

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In order to understand how virtual images are formed in plane and convex mirrors, one must understand what virtual images are. A virtual image is generally defined as an image formed at a position at which principle rays of light intersect when projected backwards behind a lens . A...

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In order to understand how virtual images are formed in plane and convex mirrors, one must understand what virtual images are. A virtual image is generally defined as an image formed at a position at which principle rays of light intersect when projected backwards behind a lens. A typical example of this is both plane and convex mirrors. Because of this, virtual images can be seen by an observer or camera, but cannot be projected onto a screen like a real image can be.  

This definition holds true for both plane and convex mirrors. However, in a plane mirror, the virtual image is the same size as the object it is reflecting, but only at the exact point where the object is located. However, changes in the relative angle of view by an observer looking at an object and the mirror can make the object in the mirror appear bigger or smaller due to differences in distance between the the observer, and the mirror and object, respectively.

Alternatively, while convex mirrors also produce virtual upright images, these images are smaller in size than the object they are reflecting when observed from the exact point at which the object is located. This allows convex mirrors to reflect and show a much larger field of view relative to the size of the mirror. Hope this helps!  

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