In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, how is Victor's emotional state?

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Victor Frankenstein's very much a bundle of contradictions. On the one hand, he's man of science, a man of reason. On the other, he's a deeply emotional character, prone to sudden outbursts of rage, anxiety, and despair. In some respects, Frankenstein represents the contradictions of Romanticism. This was a movement that, in its early stages, at any rate, sought to build on the intellectual gains of the Enlightenment, while at the same time re-emphasizing those factors that Enlightenment thinkers had overlooked or ignored such as mystery, spirituality, and man's emotional life.

In his own way Victor tries to reconcile the emotional and rational sides of his personality. This generates enormous inner conflict throughout the book, causing Frankenstein frequently to plunge into the depths of despair as the full, horrific consequences of his life's work become all too apparent.

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M.P. Ossa eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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On chapter 5 of Frankenstein, we witness the birth of the monster as well as the realization of Victor of the thing he has just done.

When he realizes the depth and importance of his project he is also encountered with its crude reality: The creature 's yellow eye...

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