How does Victor Frankenstein feel toward the monster he has created? 

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Victor Frankenstein has been fixated on creating human life from inanimate bodies parts and has worked himself into the ground to achieve this goal, isolating himself from other people. However, he has not sufficiently imagined or thought through what will face him on the other end and is not emotionally prepared for what he sees. When the creature comes to life, it is so hideous that Victor flees it in terror and revulsion.

Abandoned, the creature finds that he is rejected by humankind. When he finally encounters Victor in the Alps some two years later, the creature has taught himself to read and to speak. He communicates the anguish he has experienced at being abandoned and made a lonely outcast, and he demands that Victor build him a bride. Victor is moved by his words—and his threat to retaliate if he is not given a mate.

In the end, however, Victor is unable to fully empathize with the needs of his creature. He rips apart the bride, fearful of a race of such beings emerging if Victor and his bride can have children. He never offers the creature an alternative life, perhaps by making him a part, even if hidden, of his own family or offering him love and companionship with himself or in some other way. He simply abandons the creature a second time, leading his creation to destroy Victor's family and then chasing Victor with the intent of killing him.

For all his seeming refinement and sensitivity, Victor is never able to see through the monster's appearance to his suffering and inherently kind human soul underneath that yearns for love. This has been read as a parable about both childbirth—the revulsion a mother can experience at her newborn—and about colonialism, signalling the revulsion that Europeans sometimes felt at the appearance of native peoples in other parts of the world.

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Frankenstein hates his notorious creation right from the start. Far from pushing the boundaries of science as he'd originally intended, he ended up creating a hideous monster which he finds instantly repulsive. In that terrible moment, in what should have been Victor's finest hour, Frankenstein realizes that he's made a catastrophic mistake. How catastrophic, only time will tell. But for now Victor is so utterly repulsed by the Monster that he runs away from it.

However, he soon realizes that he can run, but he can't hide. The Monster quickly takes on a life of its own and starts throwing its weight about, making demands of the man who is supposed to be his master. And when those demands aren't met—such as his demand that Victor make him a companion—he starts making threats, which as Frankenstein soon discovers to his horror, are by no means idle.

Even when the Monster begins to show more recognizably human characteristics—he learns to read Paradise Lost and develops feelings—Victor still doesn't want to have anything to do with him. As far as he's concerned, the Monster is a mistake, a freak of nature, and he wishes he'd never created the thing in the first place. To some extent, this attitude is an expression of self-loathing, as Victor recognizes that he has a lot more in common with his creation than he'd care to admit.

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Immediately following the moment when the creature first comes to life, Victor's dream of nearly two years, he says that "the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart."  He is unable even to look at the creature, and so he runs from the room.  Victor did not expect to have this response because he actually chose the creature's features to be beautiful, and though it seemed "ugly" when it was unfinished, Victor now feels that the horror of seeing its features animated is truly awful.  For this reason, Victor calls him a "wretch" and a "miserable monster," saying that "no mortal could support the horror of that countenance."

Two years later, when Victor has returned to Geneva, he sees the creature and realizes that it was he who killed Victor's brother.  After the murder conviction and execution of Justine, who the creature framed, Victor travels to Chamounix to take in the scenes of nature and, he hopes, to be healed by them.  However, the creature takes this opportunity to confront Victor, and Victor calls him a "devil."  However, the creature's words force Victor to feel "the duties of a creator towards his creature [...]."  Thus, after hearing the creature's story, Victor feels some obligation to grant his request for a mate.  It isn't until he has second thoughts and destroys the mate he worked on that the creature vows to exact revenge.  At this point, the creature becomes the monster Victor felt him to be, and he picked off Victor's loved ones one by one.  It is this behavior, most especially the murder of Elizabeth, that compels Victor to take his revenge on the creature or die trying.

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