How is Tom Robinson an outcast in To Kill A Mockingbird?

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Tom Robinson is an outcast in Maycomb, Alabama because he is a handicapped African-American accused of a violent crime. In the prejudiced county of Maycomb, black people are discriminated against and segregated from the population. Tom lives on the far side of the town, separated from the white population, similar...

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Tom Robinson is an outcast in Maycomb, Alabama because he is a handicapped African-American accused of a violent crime. In the prejudiced county of Maycomb, black people are discriminated against and segregated from the population. Tom lives on the far side of the town, separated from the white population, similar to an outcast. Tom Robinson has been wrongly accused of raping Mayella Ewell, and the community views him with contempt. Helen, Tom's wife, has even been shunned by the white community and is out of a job because no one wants to be associated with Tom's family. Only Atticus Finch is willing to defend and support him throughout the trial. He is not accepted by the Maycomb community which makes him an outcast. During the trial, the readers learn that Tom has a crippled left arm. His handicap makes him different from the other members of the community and adds to his description as an outcast. When Tom dies, the majority of the community feels indifferent and could care less. Throughout the novel, Tom is shunned, viewed with contempt, and eventually forgotten...which makes him an outcast.

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