How is Tiny Tim from A Christmas Carol considered an innocent youth? Please provide evidence and examples from the movie.

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Tiny Tim is an innocent victim of poverty designed to make the viewer or reader sympathetic.

There are hundreds of movie versions of A Christmas Carol , but the basic plot is the same in most of them. Tiny Tim is one of the most popular characters in the book...

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Tiny Tim is an innocent victim of poverty designed to make the viewer or reader sympathetic.

There are hundreds of movie versions of A Christmas Carol, but the basic plot is the same in most of them. Tiny Tim is one of the most popular characters in the book or movie.  He is cute, crippled, and sweet. What’s not to love?

Tiny Tim is Bob Cratchit’s youngest son. Scrooge seems to have no idea of his existence, or of the existence of the rest of Cratchit’s family. When the Ghost of Christmas Present takes Scrooge on a tour, he stops by the Cratchit place.  Scrooge becomes enamored of Tiny Tim almost immediately. He is described as good by his family, and he makes an absolutely adorable blessing. Scrooge worries about him because he is crippled, and asks the ghost if Tiny Tim will live.

“I see a vacant seat,” replied the Ghost, “in the poor chimney-corner, and a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die.”

“No, no,” said Scrooge. “Oh, no, kind Spirit! say he will be spared.” (Stave 3)

When Scrooge goes to the future, he learns that Tiny Tim died and watches the family mourn him. He is very sad to learn this, especially since in his mind he is reformed. The new Scrooge cares a lot about people, especially Tiny Tim. He should have helped the boy.

There is something about Tiny Tim that is symbolic for Scrooge. The boy reminds him of his lonely childhood. He is sympathetic toward him, and comes to care about him as if he was his own son. He keeps his word to Bob Cratchit that he will help the family.

[To] Tiny Tim, who did not die, he was a second father. He became as good a friend, as good a master, and as good a man, as the good old city knew, or any other good old city, town, or borough, in the good old world.

Like the other two children, Ignorance and Want, Tiny Tim is an innocent victim of poverty. Dickens is making the point that people need to look out for each other through children. Tiny Tim is a perfect symbol of the vulnerable. He is a very effective reminder that everyone deserves a better life.

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Dickens' A Christmas Carol has been analyzed in a variety of ways through the years, and there are many movie versions.  However, the character of Tiny Tim is easy to see as representative of innocence in them all.  Dickens himself grew up in difficult circumstances, and through his hardship as a young man, it's easy to see how he would have come to view children as the innocent victims of society and humanity at that time.  Tiny Tim is the perfect example of a child born into the filth, disease and poverty of Victorian London.  Through no fault of his own, Tiny Tim is living in reduced circumstances and with an illness (likely caused by those circumstances), for which he is unable to gain treatment (due to his unearned poverty).  He is clearly "innocent" of any reason for his situation...as are many of that time and place (which Dickens is clearly attempting to point out through his writing). Furthermore, Dickens' story shows us the Ghost of Christmas Present who reveals the children named Innocence and Want.  The ghost warns Scrooge to beware the boy more, as on his forehead is written "doom". This could be seen as correlative to the male character of Tiny Tim.  In the end, Scrooge comes to realize that he (and perhaps society as a whole), is responsible for Tiny Tim (rather than Tiny Tim himself being culpable), and ultimately comes to his aid. 

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