How successful is the last chapter in Kill a mockingbird?Please comment on the way the paragraph contrast with the one before, The way the house is described and how it provides an satisfying...

How successful is the last chapter in Kill a mockingbird?

Please comment on the way the paragraph contrast with the one before, The way the house is described and how it provides an satisfying ending to the chapter.     

Thankyou.

Expert Answers
cldbentley eNotes educator| Certified Educator

When Jean Louise "Scout" Finch walks Arthur "Boo" Radley home, she is left standing on the front porch as he enters his house.  Because she had previously been too frightened to come near the Radley house of her own free will, she had never had the chance to view the town (or anything else) from what might have been Boo's vantage point.  When Scout realizes that Boo could have seen the whole street, she begins to recall events that had happened and to understand how Boo might have interpreted them.  She came to understand that Boo, who was truly a gentle and kind person, watched them and showed his true personality through his actions.  Scout was able to sum up a great moral lesson in only a few sentences:

Atticus was right.  One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them.  Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.

The knowledge that Scout has learned this lesson and that Boo has been freed in a sense allows the reader to feel at peace with all that has happened. 

Read the study guide:
To Kill a Mockingbird

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