How does the poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" relate to a human being's life?

The poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" relates to humanity by illustrating the appeal of nature, which often competes with civilization.

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Throughout the poem, the speaker stops with his horse to view the snowy forest on the darkest evening of the year. The speaker and his horse are completely alone to witness the tranquil landscape, and the horse seems confused as to why they have stopped in the middle of the...

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Throughout the poem, the speaker stops with his horse to view the snowy forest on the darkest evening of the year. The speaker and his horse are completely alone to witness the tranquil landscape, and the horse seems confused as to why they have stopped in the middle of the wilderness. The speaker then reflects on the beauty of the scenery and mentions that he has obligations that draw him from the allure of nature. The poem relates to humanity by illustrating the appeal of the natural environment, which often competes with civilization. Despite the tranquility and his fascination for the forest landscape, the narrator mentions that he has "promises to keep," which implies that he has responsibilities that he must attend. Readers can interpret that Frost is commenting on the importance of reconnecting with nature throughout our fast-paced lives. Taking an opportunity to pause from one's busy life to enjoy the natural environment is often a peaceful experience. Other critics have interpreted that the poem is a meditation on death, and the speaker resists committing suicide to return to a mundane life. In this interpretation, the woods symbolically represents the allure of death.

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In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the horse in the poem thinks it's strange that the narrator is stopping in an unusual place to look at the snowfall. The horse is impatient to get on, but the narrator lingers where he can watch the snow fall in the woods. This episode relates to the way in which human beings often live without really looking around. The owner of the farmhouse is not there to see the lovely woods during the snowfall, and the horse, unaccustomed to stopping, is eager to get moving. Similarly, people like to remain on their usual paths and do not often take time or stop their routines to smell the figurative roses. As a result, people often miss out on seeing beautiful and inspiring sights or experiencing something new and transcendent.

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