How does Squealer explain Napoleon's intention to build the windmill, after all?

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In Chapter Five of Animal Farm, Napoleon makes the unexpected announcement that he will build the windmill. This is unexpected because Napoleon was opposed to the windmill from the very start, and expelled Snowball from the farm, three Sundays earlier, when he realised that Snowball was about to win...

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In Chapter Five of Animal Farm, Napoleon makes the unexpected announcement that he will build the windmill. This is unexpected because Napoleon was opposed to the windmill from the very start, and expelled Snowball from the farm, three Sundays earlier, when he realised that Snowball was about to win the popular vote. 

Squealer explains Napoleon's decision by saying that he had never been opposed to the building of the windmill and that it was, in fact, Napoleon's idea from the very beginning. While this account is fictional, it has two functions in the text: firstly, it is used to blacken Snowball's character and reputation, and, secondly, to enhance Napoleon's prestige on the farm. This idea is supported by Squealer's further explanation to the animals; specifically, that Napoleon pretended to be opposed to the windmill because he sensed Snowball's "dangerous character" and "bad influence." In reality, Snowball poses no threat to the animals but vilifying him is an essential step on Napoleon's path to total control and domination of the farm. 

To make Squealer's propaganda technique even more effective, he tells the animals that this is a technique called "tactics." By making the animals feel included, he and Napoleon further gain their trust and confidence. Again, this is what enables Napoleon to assume complete control of the farm, later in the novel. 

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