how to solve (1.4-1.2+ 22/15) divided by 7/6? I know i have to solve the brackets first.But within the brackets, shouldn't I be adding 1.2 and 22/15 according to BODMAS rule? It's confusing me....

how to solve (1.4-1.2+ 22/15) divided by 7/6?

I know i have to solve the brackets first.But within the brackets, shouldn't I be adding 1.2 and 22/15 according to BODMAS rule? It's confusing me. whether to apply BODMAS (OR PEMDAS) first or go from left to right. PLs. help.

Thanks,

Sh

Asked on by shubh76

2 Answers | Add Yours

gsenviro's profile pic

gsenviro | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

(1.4-1.2 + 22/15) / (7/6)

we can write 22/15 = 1.47 

then the question becomes,

(1.4-1.2+1.47)/(7/6) = 1.67/(7/6) = 1.67 x 6/7 = 1.43 (or 10/7) 

In this case, it does not matter whether we add first or subtract first, within the bracket.

for example, addition first will result in 1.4-1.2+1.47 = 2.87-1.2 =1.67

subtraction first will result in 1.4-1.2+1.47 = 0.2+1.47 = 1.67

The bracket has to be solved first, as per BODMAS; but within the bracket addition or subtraction, any of the operation can be done first. 

If you want to get an answer in fraction, we can subtract first and solve it in the following manner:

1.4-1.2+ 22/15 = 0.2+22/15 = (0.2x15+22)/15 = (3+22)/15 = 25/15 = 5/3

and dividing by 7/6, we get

(5/3)/(7/6) = (5x6)/(7x3) = 30/21 = 10/7

Educator Approved

Educator Approved
iamkaori's profile picture

iamkaori | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 2) Salutatorian

Posted on

PEMDAS and BODMAS pretty much are the same rules, the only difference is that in BODMAS they give a broader view of orders that are basically variations of exponents (roots and powers). 

In this case, you just work your way left to right just as both BODMAS and PEMDAS tell you. In this case I'm assuming 22/15 is a fraction.

(1.4 - 1.2 + 22/15) / 7/6

= (0.2 + 22/15) / 7/6

= (1/5 + 22/15) / 7/6

= (3/15 + 22/15) / 7/6

= (25/15) / 7/6

= 5/3 / 7/6

= 5/3 * 6/7

= 30/21

= 10/7

So the final answer is 10/7.

We’ve answered 318,930 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question