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How are social justice and civil rights related? Can you have one without the other? Why or why not?

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In my opinion, social justice and civil rights are not necessarily simultaneous, but they are most definitely linked. First, for the purposes of this question, we need to establish exactly what society we are discussing, as each society is going to have its own history in terms of social justice...

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In my opinion, social justice and civil rights are not necessarily simultaneous, but they are most definitely linked. First, for the purposes of this question, we need to establish exactly what society we are discussing, as each society is going to have its own history in terms of social justice and civil rights and equality. If we are discussing the United States, then it is important to note that the US has had (and still has) an evolving relationship with both of these concepts. In a perfect world, social justice and civil rights would evolve and grow together. However, that has rarely been the case in the United States. Ideally, our concept of social justice revolves around social norms that are by and large accepted by society. The problem is that historically (as well as today, in my opinion) the very people that are kept outside of the social justice loop are those who have a minority view or experience that the majority of the population do not identify with. There are tons of examples to bear this out in the US: the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s, the women's liberation and equality movements (as well as "Me too" currently), and the gay rights movement. In each case, there was a minority group in society that, in one way or another, was not experiencing true social justice, as in some way they were not able to do something that their majority counterparts were able to. The problem historically seems to be that the majority is slow to react to social change and the evolving needs of society. In each case there was slow progression toward equality in civil rights and the necessary laws to establish social justice. So, in closing, are they related? Absolutely. Can you have one without the other? Absolutely not.

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