How should the policy-makers of the international community(policy makers) deal with the rise of China?China is rising and may be the next world hegemon. When there is a change in power countries...

How should the policy-makers of the international community(policy makers) deal with the rise of China?

China is rising and may be the next world hegemon. When there is a change in power countries feel less secure. For example the rise of the Soviet Union, rise of Germany in WW1 and WW2. Sometimes wars occur because the rising country is making another country feel less secure and uncertain of the further actions that the country will have. I am interested in the best solution for dealing with this change and fear.

Asked on by missak

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I would argue that international policymakers should not worry about the rise of China.  They should go ahead and try to ensure that their own countries' economies are doing as well as possible and they should continue to keep their foreign policies about as they are.  In other words, they should not try to do anything to prevent the rise of China.

One major reason for this is that China is not, in the foreseeable future, a major military worry for most of the world.  Their vaunted aircraft carrier that just launched is simply a retread Soviet-era carrier that does not even have nuclear power.  When compared to the US's 11 carrier groups, this one old carrier is not much to worry about.  Similarly, China has done very little to cause people to worry that it will have any sort of an expansionist foreign policy (with the exception of its immediate neighborhood, where it is throwing its weight around some on issues like the Spratlys and Taiwan).

China is far from becoming a major military power.  To the extent that it is increasing its military, it is still nowhere near to threatening the established world powers in the way that Germany and the USSR did.  Therefore, policymakers should do nothing drastic to try to combat China's rise.

Economically, China tends to work within the current international system.  They are not trying to destroy it, just to make it work to their advantage.  This does not seem like a major worry that needs to be addressed in extraordinary ways.

Overall, then, I think that policymakers should not try to do anything out of the ordinary to resist China's rise because this rise is "natural" (due to China's size) and is relatively unthreatening.

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