How is the setting of James Joyce's story "Araby" related to the boy's state of mind?

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The boy's home is on a "quiet street" where the houses all have "brown imperturbable faces." The air inside is "musty," and one room is "littered with old useless papers." A priest, the previous tenant of the narrator's home, had died there. The backyard contains a "wild garden" with a "central apple-tree" with a "few straggling bushes" and some rusty junk. Dusk falls early, and the days are short, because it is winter.

The setting forms a really dark and somber backdrop to the boy's state of mind: he seems to focus on light much more than darkness, perhaps because there is so little light...

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           The boy’s biblical and holy descriptions of the setting and Magan’s sister enhance his sacred adoration toward her which ultimately leads him through maturation from a boy to a man. To the boy, the girl is saintly and angelic; she is always surrounded by “light”, as if by a halo. She becomes an object of faith to the boy and when she finally talks to him the light “[catches] the white curve of her neck, [lights] her hair… [and] the hand”. When she tells him how she wishes to go to the Araby, he promises he will “bring something back”. He imagines himself as a knight in search of the Holy Grail and his trip to the Araby is to him a holy crusade. The bazaar is filled with “darkness” and “silence” which he describes as an enchanted “church after a service”. Yet, as the Holy Grail was never found, the boy realizes at the bazaar that his love is not to be found. Through such realization, the boy takes his first step to adulthood.

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