How is the sentiment of black nationalism exemplified in David Walker's "Appeal?"

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Black nationalism is the idea that black people should keep to themselves and rely on themselves.  It was the ideal of Malcolm X, for example (especially before he went to Mecca) as opposed to that of Martin Luther King, Jr.  It is a more aggressive stance -- one that asserts...

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Black nationalism is the idea that black people should keep to themselves and rely on themselves.  It was the ideal of Malcolm X, for example (especially before he went to Mecca) as opposed to that of Martin Luther King, Jr.  It is a more aggressive stance -- one that asserts the goodness (and at times superiority) of black people.

You can see some of this in how Walker's appeal is directed at black people so explicitly.  He calls them "brethern" and argues that they must solve their own problems.  He seems to reject white society, often saying "among the whites" as if they were some other sort of people.

Walker's appeal is by blacks, for blacks.  That is why it exemplifies black nationalism.

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