Samanas

How are the Samanas described in Siddhartha?

Expert Answers info

thetall eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2014

write1,737 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Business

Siddhartha , son of a Brahman, is unable to find peace and harmony and embarks on a journey that he believes will help him learn and achieve his goals. He leaves his father’s home to join the Samanas in order to experience their ways and learn from them. According to the book, Samanas are portrayed as ascetics wandering through nature. They are known to be individuals seeking peace and harmony through self-denial and meditation. They deny themselves everything considered superficial such as beauty, happiness and sensuality. Samanas practice their belief in order to get rid of the self, which...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 349 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

Noelle Thompson eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2008

write2,689 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial


mkcapen1 | Student

In the book Siddhartha the Samanas are like the priests who devote their lives to pain and suffering in order to reach Nirvana, a state of perfect peace and tranquility.  They wear loin cloths and a cloak that is not festive.  They fast often so they can experience hunger and learn to control their body.  They are thin and look like they have starved themselves.

The Samanas deny themselves the luxuries of the flesh to include any thing of pleasure such as food or comforts.  They are a type of monk from the area in which Siddhartha lived.  They dwell in the forest away from risk of sin and commune with nature.

check Approved by eNotes Editorial