how do roots absorb water?  

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

Roots are plant structures which are specialized to absorb water, provide anchorage, and store plant materials. The outermost tissue of a root is composed of epidermal cells, which have long, fine extensions called root hairs to maximize surface area. Water enters the root hairs by osmosis, and the travels from the root hairs thruogh the cells of the cortex until it reaches vascular tissue, which provides a conduction path up the plant to the leaves.

Until the water enters the vascular tissue, it moves by osmosis. Once it is in the vascular tissue, it rises up the plant by transpirational pull, which is a bulk fluid movement caused by water escaping from the leaves. Because water is a polar substance it has a tendency to cling to itself, so every molecule tugs the one below it upward as water transpires out the stomates.

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element-water | Student, Grade 6 | (Level 1) Salutatorian

Posted on

The first post was great!

Every plant has roots which grow a bunch of tiny hairs near its tip to absorb water from the soil.

The links below provide information that is easy to understand, so feel free to use them.

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