How are Robert Walton the explorer and Victor Frankenstein alike and different in Shelley's Frankenstein?

How are Robert Walton the explorer and Victor Frankenstein alike and different in Shelley's Frankenstein?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Walton and Frankenstein are both alike in that they are scientists keen to discover more about the world around them. As the story begins, Walton is on a scientific expedition, traveling aboard a ship headed for the icy wastes of the Arctic circle. Victor, of course, was himself recently involved in scientific research of his own, albeit of a different kind.

When Robert and Victor first meet, there's an instant rapport between them, not just because they're fellow scientists, but because they're quite lonely individuals. Robert feels isolated on his journey to the frozen North; one of the reasons why he writes so many letters to his sister is because he has no one aboard ship with whom he can converse.

Victor is also an isolated figure, a man isolated by his extraordinary genius. He has further separated himself from his fellow man by engaging in such a dangerous and reckless experiment. And the feelings of guilt that he develops over the tragic consequences of his creating the Monster only...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 641 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial
Last Reviewed by eNotes Editorial on