In "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," what do Huck's criticisms of Grangerford's paintings reveal about himself?Does he lack of a taste of arts? Or what is the answer to the following question:...

In "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," what do Huck's criticisms of Grangerford's paintings reveal about himself?

Does he lack of a taste of arts? Or what is the answer to the following question:

Huck's criticisms of the girl's paintings:

1. are unwanted;

2. are softened by consessions.

3. show his immaturity.

4. reveal his lack of taste.

Asked on by james2011

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herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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In the novel Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, chapter 17, we find Huck in the Grangerford's house. This house is very interesting because it is similar to a house of mirrors: Nothing is what it appears to be. First, the family is overly tacky, uber sentimental, and just stuffy. However, Huck does not know the difference between good and bad taste, so he deeply admires every single aspect about the Grangerfords, from the decorations of the house, to Mr. Grangerford himself. He even likes the art done by their deceased daughter, Emmeline. It is odd to imagine how Huck admires Emmeline's tacky and creepy art when, to top it off, there is a flower arrangement indicating her death hanging from one of the paintings. It is very creepy, indeed!

This being said, we can conclude the following (to answer your question directly):

Huckleberry's comments are just comments he makes to himself, so they are neither unwanted nor unwarranted- he is making an opinion. Answer 1 is not correct.

Although his taste does show immaturity, it would be more immature to criticize a GOOD painting as if it weren't good. However, we know that Emmeline's paintings ARE hideous. He was merely pointing exactly how it looks in his eyes. Therefore, answers 3 and 4 are not correct because, first, Huckleberry is more honest than anything else in his observations. Secondly, since the picture is already tasteless, it would not be fair to say that Huck's opinion show a lack of taste. He does not even say anything mean about them.

What seems to be the correct answer is option 2: Huckleberry was intrigued and infatuated with the Grangerford's lifestyle. This being said, he would find something positive in everything he sees. He even says that it felt like

                             nothing couldn’t be better

at the Grangerford home. Hence, what Huck actually does is to soften his opinion by offering concessions. He concedes everything a chance to be beautiful because he feels attached to the Grangerford. He makes concessions out of his appreciation for them.

 

 

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