How does Ray Bradbury use hyperbole in his novel Fahrenheit 451?

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In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury often uses hyperbole to display Montag and other sympathetic characters's dissatisfaction with the dystopian nature of their world. Montag is not too fond of the "parlor walls." He finds them asinine and bombastic and, when he reflects on them, describes his experience as though he is in some unimaginable tempest, the sounds shaking his bones and causing him immense discomfort. Obviously, the parlor walls are not as invasive as all that, but the hyperbole is used to show Montag's extreme disdain for them.

Bradbury engages again in hyperbole through the character of Beatty, who describes the decline of literary appreciation by exaggerating that classics are cut down until at last they are a "ten- or twelve-line dictionary resume." This outwardly gleeful but bitter hyperbole is our first deeper insight into Beatty, showing the reader that he may not be as supportive of the system as he seems.

Hyperbole is the use of extreme exaggeration for the purpose of...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 571 words.)

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