How is Rabindranath Tagore's religious philosophy reflected in the Gitanjali?

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In Gitanjali, Rabindranath Tagore vividly describes the religious and spiritual significance of man’s purpose in life. Tagore combines metaphysical qualities with subtle nuances of devotion to outline how God exists in finite and infinite forms. The religious philosophy reflected in the poems in Gitanjali is of eternal love for...

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In Gitanjali, Rabindranath Tagore vividly describes the religious and spiritual significance of man’s purpose in life. Tagore combines metaphysical qualities with subtle nuances of devotion to outline how God exists in finite and infinite forms. The religious philosophy reflected in the poems in Gitanjali is of eternal love for the Divine: how the veil of illusion dispels into thin air once a person attains self-realization.

The rhythm and the mood of the poems evoke a super-sensual thrill in the everyday events of life. Each of the poems conveys the idea of the beauty of life and union with the "Supreme" source of love. For Tagore, religion is a confluence of diverse spiritual experiences. In the poem "The Little Flute," Tagore writes "Thou hast made me endless, such is thy pleasure. This frail vessel thou emptiest again and again, and fillest it ever with fresh life." The poet here compares the human body to a flute, which plays the divine music.

The simplicity of Tagore’s profound verses captures the fluidity of the every-day world.

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