How do the principles of the Constitution protect our rights?

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The Constitution is the governing document of the United States and it establishes the role of the federal government, as well as the powers of the federal government. Additionally, it explains which powers are given to which branches of the government. One of the things one must consider when understanding...

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The Constitution is the governing document of the United States and it establishes the role of the federal government, as well as the powers of the federal government. Additionally, it explains which powers are given to which branches of the government. One of the things one must consider when understanding how the Constitution protects our rights is the debate on whether or not to ratify the Constitution. Federalists supported a stronger federal government and the Constitution, but a significant portion of the populous held the Antifederalist viewpoint that creating a stronger federal government could lead to potential abuse of power by that government, and ultimately a loss of rights. The Antifederalist opposition to the Constitution ultimately helped lead to the first ten amendments to the Constitution which is known as the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights provided certain protections for all citizens against the power of the federal government. Some of these rights included freedom of speech, the right to bear arms, freedom of religion, no unlawful search and seizure, and no cruel and unusual punishment (among others). I would argue that the Bill of Rights is the critical part of the Constitution which protects the rights of American citizens.

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The U.S. Constitution is the founding document of the U.S. government. It sets up the structure of the federal government and articulates the rights of individuals in the United States. The Constitution sets up the three branches of government: the executive branch, the legislative branch, and the judicial branch. These three areas of government act as checks and balances against each other to ensure that no one area of government is too powerful. For example, Congress (the legislative branch) can pass a law but the President (Executive Branch) can veto that law. The most obvious source of individual rights in the Constitution is in the Bill of Rights which tells us which civil and political freedoms we all possess. For example, the First Amendment gives us freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and freedom of assembly. Ultimately, the Constitution acts to clearly describe the powers of the federal government, which helps to ensure that the government does not overstep its bounds and infringe on the rights of states or individuals.

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