How are the origins of India nationalism linked to British rule? How did Indians and British view each other's culture in the 1800s? The British Take Over India*

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The unifying force of British Colonialism allowed the Indian nation to see itself as one.  This was suggested by the previous post and is highly valid.  In amplifying this, I think that one could make the argument that over time, the resentment of British rule helped to bring the nation...

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The unifying force of British Colonialism allowed the Indian nation to see itself as one.  This was suggested by the previous post and is highly valid.  In amplifying this, I think that one could make the argument that over time, the resentment of British rule helped to bring the nation together.  The notion of being taxed unfairly, exploited both politically and economically, and the premise of "the outsiders" making homes within helped to drive the engine of Indian nationalism.  Movements like the Sepoy Mutiny helped to bring light to the overall unfairness of British rule and bring major questioning to the Raj and India's role within it.  The cultural divide between both began to emerge as nationalism began to emerge with imperialistic rule. Add to this growing divide, the events of the 20th century around the world that were marked by the continual calls for freedom and democratic rule, nationalism was almost inevitable as well as the end of British imperialism.

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Before the British came to India, there was no sense of India being one country.  It was, for the most part, split up into a number of different political entities.

Gradually, however, being under British rule moved the Indian people towards a feeling of nationhood.  This is largely because Indians from various areas were able to feel more kinship to each other when they had the British as a common enemy.

Some scholars also say that Indians moved toward nationalism in emulation of the British (because the British themselves were nationalists so the Indians learned it from them).

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