How does Ophelia describe Hamlet's behavior to Polonius in Act 2 of Hamlet by William Shakespeare? What happens in this incident?  

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Ophelia has been instructed by Polonius to stop communicating with Hamlet -- to "repel his letters" and deny him access to her. So when Ophelia comes to report Hamlet's behavior to Polonius, she is motivated by more than fear. She is being the dutiful daughter. The incident she relates suggests that something is terribly wrong with Hamlet. At this point in the play, the audience may doubt whether it's genuine madness or merely a clever attempt to appear mad. Ophelia fears it's the former.

Ophelia begins by describing the extreme nature of Hamlet's appearance. He isn't merely disheveled or failing to live up to the formal dress code; he's downright dirty ("stockings fouled") and rather shockingly undressed. His doublet (jacket) is "unbraced" (or completely open), and his dirty stockings are pooled around his ankles. Gentlemen in Shakespeare's day wore thigh-high stockings. This was a world without elastics, so the stockings were held up with garters. Hamlet (Ophelia tells us) is "ungart'red."...

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