How old are George and Lennie?

George and Lennie's exact ages are never specified in Of Mice and Men, but it is likely that they are both in their twenties or thirties.

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John Steinbeck never tells his readers the specific ages of George and Lennie . Though both men are likely a similar age since they grew up together, the reader is given the impression throughout the novella that George is perhaps slightly older than Lennie—certainly he is more mature. Due to...

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John Steinbeck never tells his readers the specific ages of George and Lennie. Though both men are likely a similar age since they grew up together, the reader is given the impression throughout the novella that George is perhaps slightly older than Lennie—certainly he is more mature. Due to the physical nature of the work they're seeking, it seems likely that both men are in their twenties or thirties, although in terms of personality and cognitive ability, Lennie is much younger than this.

Lennie, who is often compared to a child, relies on George to take care of him and help him to function in society. Thinking on his feet, George lies to their new boss, telling him that Lennie is his cousin and that his condition is the result of being kicked in the head by a horse when he was a child. George and Lennie's ages matter far less than the roles which they assume, with Lennie being in some ways akin to a child and George often acting as the adult trying to make ends meet. The two share a brotherly relationship, and that George genuinely tries to look out for Lennie's best interests, taking on the role of the older, more responsible member of the pair.

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