How is the narrative in Ceremony nonlinear in its use of time, and why would Silko use nonlinear temporality in the novel?

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Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Ceremony is nonlinear in its use of time, and this is evidenced by the continual flashbacks and forwards that the story makes.  Further, the narrative is not all prose, and some of the poetry that intersects the narrative is removed from the actual plot of...

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Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Ceremony is nonlinear in its use of time, and this is evidenced by the continual flashbacks and forwards that the story makes.  Further, the narrative is not all prose, and some of the poetry that intersects the narrative is removed from the actual plot of the story and discusses myth instead.  Silko chooses to use nonlinear temporality in the novel to mimic Pueblo storytelling.  This type of storytelling, as it is with the storytelling of many other Native American tribes, is based on a long standing oral tradition in which stories were passed through generations.  These stories contained many symbols, images, and poetic verses, and Silko also recreates these in her novel.  The nonlinear structure suggests that these stories are never-ending.

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