How does Muni describe the village headman?

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Muni describes the village headman as an unscrupulous, avaricious, and distrustful person.

In the story, Muni only begins talking about the village headman after the foreigner brandishes a hundred-rupee note before him. Muni finds it humorous that anyone would think of asking him to change a high-value note. At least, this is what Muni thinks the foreigner is asking.

Of course, the foreigner is asking no such thing. However, Muni continues talking about the village headman. He contends that the headman is a dishonest fellow; he cheats fellow villagers out of their hard-earned money and hides the ill-gotten gain underneath the floor of his puja (worship) room. Despite his misgivings, Muni directs the foreigner to the village headman. We must remember that Muni still thinks the foreigner needs the services of a moneylender. He advises the foreigner to talk to the village headman himself.

Muni maintains that the headman has always blamed Muni's goats for the theft of his pumpkins. So, Muni describes the village headman as an unscrupulous, avaricious, and distrustful person.

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Muni, the protagonist of "A Horse and Two Goats," used to be quite a prosperous herdsman. Back in the day, he had a flock of forty sheep and goats, and this made him a relatively wealthy man by his society's standards. However, due to years of drought, famine, and disease, he's since been reduced to crushing poverty. Now he owns just two scrawny goats, which are unfit for either eating or selling.

Not everyone in Muni's village is poor, however. The village headman is relatively prosperous, just like Muni himself used to be. In fact, Muni describes the headman as the richest man in the village. Apparently, he became rich through exploiting the ignorance of the poor, illiterate villagers, lending them money at exorbitant rates of interest. With the proceeds of his ill-gotten gains, the headman has built himself the largest house in the village, and the only one made of brick.

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