In "A Rose for Emily" how much responsibility, if any, does the community bear for Miss Emily's crime?

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I'm not convinced that the town ought to bear any responsibility for Miss Emily's crime of murdering Homer Barron. The old mayor Colonel Sartoris invented a reason why she would not have to pay taxes in the town out of a respectful sort of sympathy for Emily. Had Emily known about this act of charity, she "would [not] have accepted" it. We learn that

After her father's death [some thirty years prior] she went out very little; after her sweetheart went away, people hardly saw her at all. A few of the ladies had the temerity to call, but were not received [...].

Even during Emily's father's life "None of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such." In other words, then, Emily has always been set apart: first, evidently, by her father's own wishes and then, later, as a result of her own. She seemed to demand "more than ever the recognition of her dignity as the last Grierson," and so she holds herself at a significant remove from the vast majority of people in town, excepting...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 683 words.)

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