How is Mr. Jones portrayed in the first chapter of Animal Farm?

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Mr. Jones is portrayed as taking advantage of his animals.

Manor Farm is not a very happy place for the animals. The farmer, Mr. Jones, is at best negligent and at worse abusive. He has a habit of getting drunk and forgetting to take care of his animals, or leaving...

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Mr. Jones is portrayed as taking advantage of his animals.

Manor Farm is not a very happy place for the animals. The farmer, Mr. Jones, is at best negligent and at worse abusive. He has a habit of getting drunk and forgetting to take care of his animals, or leaving the farm for long periods of time when his animals need attention.

Old Major vilifies Jones in his speech to the animals about why they should get rid of the humans. He explains that Jones is taking advantage of the animals, and that everything they have is stolen by him—including often their lives.

And what has happened to that milk which should have been breeding up sturdy calves? Every drop of it has gone down the throats of our enemies. And you hens, how many eggs have you laid in this last year, and how many of those eggs ever hatched into chickens? The rest have all gone to market to bring in money for Jones and his men. (Ch. 1)

Old Major also describes how animals are killed before they can grow old, or the ones who do grow old are killed as soon as they can no longer work. No animal gets a peaceful and quiet retirement in his old age.

You, Boxer, the very day that those great muscles of yours lose their power, Jones will sell you to the knacker, who will cut your throat and boil you down for the foxhounds. As for the dogs, when they grow old and toothless, Jones ties a brick round their necks and drowns them in the nearest pond. (Ch. 1)

The animals all live this terrible existence because of the tyranny of man. Man forces them to work for him, takes their young, and kills them whenever he feels like it. The animals do all of the hard work, and Jones does nothing. All he does is get drunk and forget to feed the animals or milk the cows.

Old Major's rhetoric is very convincing. Soon Jones is too drunk to feed the animals and they decide to revolt. They kick the humans out and take over the farm. Unfortunately, many of the abuses Old Major described continue under the new regime of pigs.

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In the first chapter of Animal Farm, Mr. Jones is portrayed in a very negative light. He is depicted as a drunk who is more interested in alcohol than tending to his farm. He is so drunk in the first paragraph that he forgets to shut the "pop-holes" when he is putting the hens away for the night.

In addition, Mr. Jones is also portrayed as a greedy, money-oriented man. In his speech, for example, Old Major talks about all of the animals who have gone to market to bring in money for Mr. Jones. Similarly, Old Major also refers to the "knackers," a place where animals like Boxer are sent when they are too old to work. Again, the purpose of the knackers is to create profit for Mr. Jones.

Finally, Jones is portrayed as cruel and ruthless. Old Major says that he drowns older dogs in the pond and, in the final paragraph of this chapter, Jones breaks up this important meeting by firing his gun in the darkness.

These portrayals are significant because they act as an inspiration for the impending rebellion.

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Mr Jones, as a human, in "Animal Farm" is portrayed by Old Major as typical, the root problem of their troubles.  According to the old boar, humans only consume, stealing from them all;  it is the animals who produce but the humans feed them little. Mr. Jones is also cruel in other ways; Old Major predicts that once the old horse, Boxer, the hardest worker on the farm, is no longer productive, Mr. Jones will get rid of him. The meeting of the animals who plan revolt breaks up when the drunken Mr. Jones hears them singing the song "Beasts of England" that Old Major remembers from his youth and he fires off his shotgun.  

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