How does the mother arrange for her daughter to play piano lessons?  

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In "Two Kinds" by Amy Tan , the narrator's mother is determined that her daughter become a noted prodigy in some—any—skill. She is forced to attempt to master random skills such as acting, memorization, and headstands before her mother finally decides to empty all her efforts into her...

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In "Two Kinds" by Amy Tan, the narrator's mother is determined that her daughter become a noted prodigy in some—any—skill. She is forced to attempt to master random skills such as acting, memorization, and headstands before her mother finally decides to empty all her efforts into her daughter's ability to play piano.

Mr. Chong lives in their building, and her mother trades housekeeping for piano lessons and the ability to practice on his piano every evening for two hours.

Unfortunately, Mr. Chong is an older retired teacher, and neither his sight nor his hearing is what it once was. The narrator determines that she can hit the occasional wrong note, but as long as she maintains the beat or covers it up, he never seems to notice.

This finally catches up with her at a recital; she is supposed to memorize the piece but confesses, "I dawdled over it, playing a few bars and then cheating, looking up to see what notes followed. I never really listened to what I was playing. I daydreamed about being somewhere else."

Everyone at the recital is wide-eyed in disbelief after her poor performance, and she even hears a young boy whisper, "That was awful."

Although piano is not her idea and her mother pushes her to excel, by not practicing as she was supposed to, her mother ends up wasting all the hours she spent doing Mr. Chong's housekeeping in exchange for his time.

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Jing-Mei's mother is fiercely ambitious for her daughter. She believes her to be a musical prodigy who will one day become a world-famous pianist. There's just one problem: piano lessons are very expensive, and Jing-Mei's mother is by no means rich. But Jing-Mei's mother is nothing if not determined, and she's prepared to do whatever it takes to make sure that her daughter receives the appropriate tuition.

She enlists the help of one of her neighbors, a retired piano teacher by the name of Mr. Chong. In return for piano lessons for her daughter, Jing-Mei's mother agrees to clean Mr. Chong's apartment. On the surface, it seems like a pretty good deal. Unfortunately, however, Mr. Chong is actually deaf and so can't hear Jing-Mei play. As a result, she never learns to play the piano properly.

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