How does Montresor describe Fortunato's strengths and weaknesses?

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Montresor claims Fortunato's greatest strength is his knowledge as a wine connoisseur, stating that Fortunato--unlike most Italians--has a "true virtuoso spirit" and is "sincere" in his mastery of old wines. He also has a personality that inspires respect and fear in others. While flattering the drunken man in his wine cellar and feigning concern over his health, Montresor comments that Forunato is "rich, respected, admired, beloved" and a happy man who will be "missed." Whether or not this is true remains to be seen, but it certainly suggests something about Montresor's motives; not only is he vengeful, but also (it seems) quite jealous. 

Fortunato's greatest weakness, however, is also a component of his strength: his love for wine. This indulgence becomes his ultimate downfall, as his inebriated state and interest in the alleged pipe of Amontillado leads him to foolishly follow Montresor to his wine cellar, where Montresor kills him by paving him behind a wall. Although perhaps less...

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