How does Miss Skeeter change throughout the novel The Help?

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One aspect of Skeeter that is difficult to make sense of and may be a flaw in the character presentation is the source of her outward-looking attitudes. We can understand that Skeeter's time at college away from Jackson opened her eyes to the prejudices in the town and created the seeds...

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One aspect of Skeeter that is difficult to make sense of and may be a flaw in the character presentation is the source of her outward-looking attitudes. We can understand that Skeeter's time at college away from Jackson opened her eyes to the prejudices in the town and created the seeds of her rejection of the society's structure and attitudes. This only partly explains her liberal values, though. Where in her upbringing do these come from; what made her so open to racial tolerance? It's not fully explained. Her love for Constantine may have given her insight and a natural propensity to see the black people with respect. Still, why is Skeeter so profoundly different from her white friends?

The corollary to this is the oddity of her friendship with Hilly. If Skeeter was inclined to broad-minded values, why would she have ever linked up with Hilly in her school days? Hilly's caricature two-dimensional awfulness is also a weakness in the novel. The respect in which she's held is at odds with her comic nastiness.

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From the beginning of the book until the end, Skeeter's attitudes completely change.

Having grown up in a southern family of means, the way of life she had always known was that every family had black maids. This was a way of life for her and also almost everyone she knew in Jackson, Mississippi.

As the book goes on, and Skeeter hears more and more of the maids' stories of what they've experienced working in white homes, her eyes become opened to the injustices that the maids were subjected to.

Her eyes also become opened to the mistreatment of the maids by people who have been her friends for her entire life. 

Her own immediate family had driven away Constantine, the maid who had practically raised her.

By the time her interviews of the maids are finished, and her book containing the interviews is published, Skeeter has totally changed her thinking and attitudes towards black people from what she had known throughout her entire childhood.

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