How might the industrial revolution have affected William Blake's poem "The Tyger"?

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In William Blake's poem "The Tyger ," Blake is criticizing the unnatural reality of industrialization. Blake sees nature as a holy creation that is to be revered, while industrialization is a manmade horror. Black asserts that no deity could possibly be responsible for creating something that stands in...

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In William Blake's poem "The Tyger," Blake is criticizing the unnatural reality of industrialization. Blake sees nature as a holy creation that is to be revered, while industrialization is a manmade horror. Black asserts that no deity could possibly be responsible for creating something that stands in such direct conflict with the natural world. This sentiment can be seen through Blake's questioning:

Tyger Tyger, burning bright,
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry? (1–4)
While many of his time were excited at the material and societal changes that proceeded the industrial revolution, Blake understood the role this mode of production would have on the natural world and human's relationship to nature. The industrial revolution has indeed lead to an astronomically devastating affect on the natural world and has ushered our planet into an age of extinction and ecological devastation. Blake's fearful and distrustful response to the industrial revolution, reflected in "The Tyger," was certainly ahead of his time and incredibly understandable.
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The Industrial Revolution was a historical period that began in Great Britain in the 18th century. During this time, technological advances initiated the transition from a primarily agrarian economy to an economy based on manufacturing and advanced machinery. Factories, the internal-combustion engine, and the use of coal as an energy source were important features of the Industrial Revolution.

The influence of the Industrial Revolution can definitely be seen in William Blake's "The Tyger." For example, take a look at the fourth stanza:

What the hammer? what the chain, 
In what furnace was thy brain? 
What the anvil? what dread grasp, 
Dare its deadly terrors clasp! (13-16)
Notice Blake's industrialized description. Rather than developing organically, Blake's tiger is constructed with a hammer, chain, furnace, and anvil. In this section of the poem, Blake seems to be conceiving of the creation of life as an industrialized process, one that has moved from the natural world to the factory. Moreover, by defining this process as "dread" and "deadly," Blake condemns this new, industrial method of creation. All in all, by describing the creation of life as part of the rise of manufacturing, Blake illustrates the terrifyingly unnatural nature of industrial production. 
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