How might the dying lines of Gertrude, Claudius, and Laertes be viewed as typical of the way their characters have been presented throughout the play?

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Gertrude's last lines are ironic because she's been poisoned—inadvertently—by Claudius. Her late husband, King Hamlet, was also poisoned by Claudius, but on that occasion there was nothing accidental about it; it was cold-blooded murder. It is ambiguous as to whether or not Gertrude knew anything about the true circumstances surrounding King Hamlet's death—but in any case, she has suffered the same fate. Her sad demise tells us what happens to those who get too close to the wicked, devious Claudius. Especially if, like Gertrude, they might be unaware of what he's really like.

Laertes's apology to Hamlet shows that he realizes that he was nothing more than a pawn in a political game all along. That's why he's so ready to forgive Hamlet killing Polonius . It seems that Laertes always knew the true circumstances of his father's death; he was stabbed by Hamlet while hiding behind a curtain and eavesdropping on a conversation between the young prince and his mother. In...

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