How might a defender of the liberal model criticize the human fulfillment model of work?

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To understand why and how a proponent of the liberal model of work might criticize the human fulfillment model of work, we must first grasp the main characteristics of these two models and the differences between them.

The liberal model of work declares that workers are free to choose what...

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To understand why and how a proponent of the liberal model of work might criticize the human fulfillment model of work, we must first grasp the main characteristics of these two models and the differences between them.

The liberal model of work declares that workers are free to choose what ends they receive from their work. If they seek personal fulfillment, that is perfectly fine. If they work only to make the money they need, that, too, is acceptable. This model denies that there is some higher goal or purpose that all work ought to serve. As long as work allows a person to make decisions for themselves and live their life according to those decisions, then work has served its purpose.

The human fulfillment model of work, on the other hand, proposes that work allows people to develop their full potential as human beings. The work a person chooses should allow that person to live a meaningful life and develop their talents, skills, character traits, virtues, and intellect. This is the goal of work, namely, to make a person the best human being they can be. If someone's work is not doing that, then perhaps it is not the right job for that person. Work is made for the person, not the person for the work.

We can see, then, that there are major differences between these two models. Proponents of the liberal model might critique the human fulfillment model by saying that it goes too far and gives work and its purpose too much influence over human life. Work is certainly important. Someone who holds to the liberal model will acknowledge that, and they will even hold that work affects the worker positively or negatively. But the proponent of the liberal model will claim that work does not have the highest goal of developing human potential. There is not a single end or goal for work, as proponents of the human fulfillment model assert. There are, rather, many ends, and it is up to the worker to choose which ones suit their situation.

In other words, proponents of the liberal model will argue that the human fulfillment model is too idealistic and does not account for the fact that people work for all kinds of reasons. Fulfillment as a person may certainly be one of those reasons, but it is not the only or ultimate reason. Workers are free to decide the purpose of their work, the liberal model defender will assert, rather than try to conform to an ideal they perhaps cannot attain.

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