In Percy Shelley's poem "Ozymandias," how many speakers do you hear? Summarize what each one says. 

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In the sonnet "Ozymandias" by Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, the audience can hear three different speakers. The first ten words are spoken by the narrator, who is the "I" of the poem, as he tells the reader that he came across a traveler from an antique land. The narrator then repeats what the traveler told him and does not appear again in the poem. The second voice of the poem is that of the foreign traveler, who proceeds to describe the ruins of a statue of Rameses II, also known as Ozymandias. The second narrator dispassionately elaborates on the trunkless legs of stone in the middle of a vast desert and describes the statue's head half-sunk and shattered in the sand. He also describes Ozymandias's cold, intimidating expression, which reveals his callous, imperious personality.

The third speaker is that of Ozymandias, which the audience hears as they read his words on the pedestal of his ruined monument. On the pedestal, Ozymandias boldly declares himself "king of kings" and...

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