How many people died in the War Of 1812?

All told, about 35,000 people died in the War of 1812, although nobody knows for sure exactly how many casualties there were.

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Most authorities agree that about 25,000 British and American people died in the war, either as casualties related to directly to combat or from disease. This number includes about 3,700 Americans and 1,900 British soldiers killed in action. All told, about 15,000 Americans and 10,000 British died.

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Most authorities agree that about 25,000 British and American people died in the war, either as casualties related to directly to combat or from disease. This number includes about 3,700 Americans and 1,900 British soldiers killed in action. All told, about 15,000 Americans and 10,000 British died.

Total casualties in the war were far greater, however, since Native Americans fought on both sides in the war and there is no accurate count of these casualties. Some estimate that about 10,000 Indigenous people died in the war. While attempts have been made to track down precisely who was killed in the war—examples include the online Database of Casualties of the War of 1812, which tracks British losses, or Micheal Clodfelter's Warfare and Armed Conflicts: A Statistical Encyclopedia of Casualty and Other Figures, 1492–2015—an exact number of deaths is impossible to determine.

The war lasted three years, and the results were marginal. The US gained no territory; Britain made no concessions to the US (other than ceding some fishing rights). Britain sought to compel the US to restore lands to their Native American allies, but a proposal to create a "buffer state" controlled by Native Americans in Ohio was rejected. The most important results of the war were psychological; the US believed it had "won," a belief that helped consolidate the national identity, while the Canadians, who repeatedly repulsed American invasions of the north, saw themselves as the victors and began to think of Canada as a separate nation.

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