How many number of molecules are there in 10 grams of nitric acid (HNO3)?

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By definition, there are about  `6*10^(23)`  molecules in each mole of any substance. This number is called Avogadro number and is usually denoted as `N_A.` If we'll find the number of moles in `10` grams of nitric acid, we'll know the number of molecules by multiplying it by `N_A.`

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Hello!

By definition, there are about  `6*10^(23)`  molecules in each mole of any substance. This number is called Avogadro number and is usually denoted as `N_A.` If we'll find the number of moles in `10` grams of nitric acid, we'll know the number of molecules by multiplying it by `N_A.`

Atoms of each type have its own mass. This mass, expressed in grams per mole, may be found in many sources including the periodic table. The values for `H,` `N` and `O` should be memorized and are about `1,` `14` and `16` grams per mole, respectively. Therefore the mass of one molecule of `HNO_3`  is  `1 + 14 + 3*16 = 63 (g/(mol)).`

Hence we have  `(10 g)/(63(g/(mol))) approx0.16 mol`  of nitric acid, and the number of molecules is about  `6*10^(23)*0.16 approx 0.95*10^(23) = 9.5*10^(22).` This is the answer.

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