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Manfred typifies the Romantic mindset partly because he is, or sees himself, an outcast. Like Faust, he is dissatisfied with "life" in its mundane form and wishes to transcend it, to experience some ultimate transformation that will enable him to break free of the ordinary, banal world. A major theme of the Romantic movement was this striving after the impossible and the perception of man as a rebel, a god-like being with the potential to venture beyond the ordinary limits imposed upon him by the laws both of God and of men.

Manfred seeks "forgetfulness." It's almost an inverted form of the seemingly positive experiences that other Romantic heroes strive for. Faust seeks some ultimate moment in time so beautiful to him that he will wish it to linger—unlike all that he has experienced in his long life and with his great knowledge. But he must make a pact with the Devil in order to accomplish this. Frankenstein wishes to do what only God has done, to create life, and he does so, but the...

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