How to make mathematics more interesting? How to design an innovative and entertaining magazine on mathematics with knowledge-oriented questions, riddles, puzzles, poems, crosswords etc.?

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You should try and try one day you can fly.....

Even you get the wrong answer you can try again. Its ok to copy from your friend but when you try it next time you will do it on your own. You will see the beauty. I have had this experience. When i was in high school trigonometry was so hard to me. I used to copy the answers of my friends and tried them along later times. finally i became very good in trigonometry.

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There are a number of websites that can make learning and teaching maths fun. I would recommend "Mangahigh.com". It is site that includes fun games as well as proper excercises. One of the best elements of the site is that it it competitve (there is a leaderboard for both schools and pupils)

The best thing is that it is free to sign up to and use.

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If you're creating a "math magazine," then make sure you take into consideration your audience.  Different age-level students like different things.  One thing you could do in your magazine would be to interview a sampling of students- think of a question to ask- maybe one of the following, for example:

1.)  What is your opinion of math?

2.)  Did you use math today (in-school subject doesn't count)

You could even present a the same math problem to all the students you're interviewing, then ask them how they would go about solving it.

Students like to read what other students (especially ones they know) have to say.

My algebra students are ALWAYS asking, "When will I have to use this in my life?"  I've considered bringing in a few speakers, from different walks of life, different careers, etc., to have them talk to the students about how they use math on a daily basis.

 

 

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I think that your ideas for a magazine full of "games" that require math skills and math-oriented thinking is a great idea, especially in the younger grades. Kids tend to like learning when it doesn't feel like learning. A book full of traditional story problems might be boring, but a story or a mystery which had the reader use math skills to solve the mystery might be just the ticket!

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I think that the best way to make mathematics more interesting is to us real world application.  I used to have my students build bridges and towers, design landscaping and do other projects using math.  You can even make simple math facts entertaining by doing a puzzle.  For example, each number is a letter and when you solve all the problems it spells out a message.  You can also practice graphing by having students graph something that turns into a picture.

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I agree that finding a way to connect mathematics to everyday life or common interests can be really helpful.  One math teacher I knew used to bring in a bucket of sea shells.  The students picked their favorite and then found a way to draw it out using mathematical formulas and graph paper.  I've also seen math assignments that incorporated sporting events, like asking students to find specific ratios or statistics in the school football game that evening. 

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Find a way for students to incorporate something they are interested in. When I was in high school, if a math teacher had let me work in something about baseball statistics I would have been a lot more engaged. Most of the things we do in math seem completely disconnected from our lives.

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