How is love stronger than hate in Romeo and Juliet

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The whole storyline revolves around Romeo and Juliet being “star-crossed lovers,” as they are the children of sworn enemies who love each other anyway. As Juliet describes the situation, “My only love, sprung from my only hate….prodigious birth of love it is to me that I must love a loathed...

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The whole storyline revolves around Romeo and Juliet being “star-crossed lovers,” as they are the children of sworn enemies who love each other anyway. As Juliet describes the situation, “My only love, sprung from my only hate….prodigious birth of love it is to me that I must love a loathed enemy.” (Act 1, scene 5, lines 142-143). For both her and Romeo, their families’ position is surpassed by their affection for each other as individuals. Juliet states, “ ‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy. Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.” (Act 2, scene 2, lines 38-39). The hatred of their respective families is overcome by the strength of feelings for each other. Eventually, the love Romeo and Juliet have for each is recognized by their parents, whose love for their now dead children allows Capulet and Montague to resolve their hatred for each other, as shown in lines 297-304, Act 5, scene 3.

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