The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

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How are the lottery of the caskets a test of character in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice?

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Portia's late father devised the caskets test as a way to keep gold-diggers away from his daughter. He knew that a young lady of such extraordinary intelligence and beauty—not to mention a generous inheritance—would attract more than her fair share of suitors. But unusually for the time, Portia's father didn't want his daughter to marry the first rich, eligible bachelor who turned up on her doorstep. He wanted to make sure that any future son-in-law of his would choose Portia for herself and not for the large dowry she would bring to the marriage.

So he put together an elaborate test that would weed out the fortune-hunters and ensure as far as possible that Portia would end up getting hitched to the right man. As he may have predicted, most of Portia's suitors turn out to be so shallow, so...

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