How did the Lilliputians react when Gulliver tried to free his left hand in Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift?

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When Gulliver frees his left arm, the Lilliputians ran out of his reach and then launched a volley of arrows into him. Of course, he is so big that the arrows do not cause him serious harm, but they hurt very badly, and Gulliver is in considerable discomfort as a...

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When Gulliver frees his left arm, the Lilliputians ran out of his reach and then launched a volley of arrows into him. Of course, he is so big that the arrows do not cause him serious harm, but they hurt very badly, and Gulliver is in considerable discomfort as a result. He thus decides to stop struggling to break free of the cables he is ensnared in, and to simply wait until the Lilliputians retire for the night, at which point he plans to set himself free. His captors have other plans. They build a platform on which a dignitary stands, delivering a speech to Gulliver while he is still tied to the ground. Gulliver does not understand the little man's speech, and gestures that he is hungry, at which point the Lilliputians supply him with mountains of food and entire hogsheads full of wine. Gulliver then considers himself "bound by the laws of hospitality" not to resist the Lilliputians violently.

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