How are laws and decision made in autocracy and democracy? Compare and contrast the two forms of government.

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Autocratic governments are unique in that decisions are made by a single person, like a monarch or dictator, who has absolute power. The decision-making process is simple in autocracies: whatever the ruler says becomes law. The result is risky: if the ruler is a good one, then the people prosper;...

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Autocratic governments are unique in that decisions are made by a single person, like a monarch or dictator, who has absolute power. The decision-making process is simple in autocracies: whatever the ruler says becomes law. The result is risky: if the ruler is a good one, then the people prosper; if the ruler is a bad one, then they don’t.

Democratic governments, on the other hand, make decisions through the will of the people, which gets expressed through their ability to cast votes. The result is a reliable moderation, as the will of the voters on the extreme fringes of society tend to cancel each other out, leading to laws and decisions that fall between the two.

Autocratic governments used to be normal, with kings, queens, or dictators ruling over vast empires. However, in recent centuries, democratic governments have become more common.

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I think that you are looking at two fundamentally different views of the political world.  For the autocrat, decisions and laws are made through their own actions and own initiation.  There is no checks or balances present, nor is there any other body from which consent is needed.  Instead, the autocrat is able to do what they want and what they see as best.  This is how laws are formed and how decisions are made.  Those who do not adhere are punished, as the leader sees it is as disobedience or betrayal or violation of what the codified structure demands.  In a democratic setting, there is more of a consensus approach to laws and decisions.  Stakeholders discuss and debate laws and actions and only after this discourse, action is taken.  Additionally, in many democratic configurations, there is a division of governmental power as to which branch enforces or creates or monitors laws and decisions that are made.  This helps to ensure that power is spread out over different elements, preventing large consolidation, which is something that the autocrat possesses in total.

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