How does Juliet show remarkable maturity?

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It is Juliet who shows maturity and intelligence, rather than pure emotion, in her relationship with Romeo. For the time period, this is a role reversal, with Romeo embodying the “traditional” feminine role of emotion, and Juliet being “logical.” In fact, Friar Laurence asks Romeo, “Art thou a man?...

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It is Juliet who shows maturity and intelligence, rather than pure emotion, in her relationship with Romeo. For the time period, this is a role reversal, with Romeo embodying the “traditional” feminine role of emotion, and Juliet being “logical.” In fact, Friar Laurence asks Romeo, “Art thou a man? ... unseemly woman in a seeming man” (Act 3, Scene 3, lines 119, 122). In Act 3, Scene 2 (lines 106-138), Juliet reasons with herself about what her course of action should be following Romeo’s killing of her cousin Tybalt. Her husband has killed her favorite cousin. What is her duty, to love or to law? Romeo is a murderer; even if he did not kill anyone, the Prince had promised that any more fighting in the streets would result in a death sentence. While she eventually decides that her loyalty is to her love, her maturity is clear in her thought process. She is reluctant to be completely controlled by emotion as Romeo is. Juliet has been trying to slow Romeo down from the beginning. Yet she finally yields to him and his troubles, even though it carries both of them further along to tragedy.

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