In Romeo and Juiiet, how is Juliet Introduced to the audience? I really need help with this question. Its really hard and i got a D in my last draft of it and have been trying to improve it ever since. Im targeted a C and i really need to reach that for year 11 at school. Please can anyone help me.   The acts that we use are act 1 scene 2 act 1 scene 3 act 1 scene 5 we have to add them into the document somehow. and put a conclusion in it as well. Fairly big. My teacher says it has to be 4 pages long at the least. Im stuck please can someone help me out ?    

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It is apparent in Act 1, scene 3 that Juliet is still very young and naive. Her father, in his conversation with Paris, states that she is "yet a stranger in the world," which implies that she has not yet attained worldly knowledge and is inexperienced. Lord Capulet believes that his daughter is much too young to marry. He mentions that she is not yet fourteen and asks Paris to give her two more years before his suit for her hand in marriage can be considered. Lord Capulet evidently cares about Juliet's well-being and suggests that an early marriage will damage her. He furthermore states that he has placed all hope in her since he has lost all other. This assertion indicates that Lord Capulet believes Juliet will stand him in good stead and not tarnish his name since she, it seems, has displayed only good qualities. It is ironic that Lord Capulet is so confident about Juliet since he will later be bitterly disappointed by her initial stubborn refusal to accede to his request that she marry

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