Examine if Jason's actions can be justified.

Yes, Jason's actions can be justified, though not exactly morally. Medea went out of her way to help Jason and he repaid her with nothing but lies. This question is very simple. The answer is yes. There are many instances in the play that show that Jason does indeed love Medea, even though he does not want to marry her. For example, when Medea was angry at him for not paying attention to her anymore and because he wanted children with another woman (p31-32), she accuses him of being cold towards her: "You're heartless- you don't care a thing about me." He responds with "That's not true; I do care,"

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I'm not entirely sure that Jason's actions can be justified. Medea went out a limb for him and he repaid her unfailing loyalty by dumping her. Medea took enormous risks to help Jason get ahold of the Golden Fleece. Yet Jason was simply using her all along; he had no...

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I'm not entirely sure that Jason's actions can be justified. Medea went out a limb for him and he repaid her unfailing loyalty by dumping her. Medea took enormous risks to help Jason get ahold of the Golden Fleece. Yet Jason was simply using her all along; he had no intention of settling down with her and making her his queen.

After being unceremoniously abandoned by Jason, Medea's reduced to the status of a non-person. She has no family ties in Corinth, and so has no one to turn to there. Besides, she's decidedly unwelcome in the city after letting rip with a blood-curdling scream of revenge. But nor can she return to Colchis after helping Jason to steal the Golden Fleece. Her own people will doubtless disown her as a traitor. Medea's in a real pickle, and it's all down to Jason. Thanks to him, Medea's caught between a rock and a hard place and there appears no way out of her terrible predicament.

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It is not easy to justify Jason's course of action.  Euripides metes out a great deal of responsibility for why Medea is the way she is because of Jason's actions.  There is a great deal of selfishness and a sense of self- indulgence that is within Jason's actions that make it difficult to persuade one that his actions actually can be justified.  It seems to me that the best approach to take is to argue that Medea's actions are not justified.  In this light, Jason's actions do not look as bad as Medea's.  Perhaps, it is in this condition that one could begin to search for some semblance of justification.  Medea's actions are so destructive socially and personally that she creates a threshold for unjustifiable actions that no one can approach.  While Jason's actions are selfish, they are nothing as selfish as Medea slaughtering their children.  Jason's actions cannot be justified on their own merit.  Yet, when compared to Medea's actions which embody the lack of justification, Jason's actions might be considered more tolerable.  Medea's actions are probably the embodiment of the lack of justification.  Jason's actions are wrong and bad, but are not to this level.  Absolute standards of conduct have become relative to the actions of another.  This might be one of the lasting legacies of the portraits that Euripides has offered.   I think that this becomes the standard that one has to use in order to determine whether or not Jason's actions can be justified.  

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