How do Jane and Elizabeth complement and contrast with each other?

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Elizabeth is much more prone to show her emotions and to jump to quick judgments than Jane. Elizabeth easily becomes prejudiced against people, as the title of the novel indicates. The chief person who earns her wrath is Mr. Darcy , who insults her when she overhears him saying...

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Elizabeth is much more prone to show her emotions and to jump to quick judgments than Jane. Elizabeth easily becomes prejudiced against people, as the title of the novel indicates. The chief person who earns her wrath is Mr. Darcy, who insults her when she overhears him saying she isn't pretty enough to dance with. This leaves her open to believing without question Wickham's false tales of being wronged by Darcy.

Jane is more cool and cautious, both about showing her emotions and about judging people. This can be both good and bad. As Charlotte Lucas warns, if Jane doesn't show more warmth and affection for Bingley, he is likely not to understand how interested she is in him. Darcy certainly underestimates the strength of Jane's feeling when he advises Bingley not to get any more entangled with her.

In Elizabeth's case, showing her passions is both good and bad: her high spirits and open disrespect for him cause Darcy to fall in love with her, but when he proposes marriage to her the first time, her fury gets the better of her, and he ends up with a tongue lashing she later regrets when she finds out the Wickham lied about him. Likewise, Jane's coolness and reserve keeps her from making snap judgments or losing her temper, but also leads Bingley to thinking she is not truly in love with him. 

The two complement each other because Elizabeth urges Jane to more passion and Jane urges Elizabeth to more caution. They are very close to each other and, despite their flaws, more intelligent than the other females in the family. 

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